Solar Water Heater Bay Harbor Islands

Posted on: July 3, 2015 by in Solar Water Heater
25 Comments
Solar Water Heater Bay Harbor Islands


Beyond Zero Emissions intends to transform Australia from a 19th century fossil fuel based economy to a 21st century renewable powered clean tech economy with no carbon emissions. Sharon Shostak met up with some local residents/BZE volunteers who have taken the initiative to build a model to demonstrate a concentrating solar thermal plant, a technology beginning to proliferate in many countries but sadly remiss in Australia.
Music excerpt by Norm Appel

25 Responses

  1. Khurram Awan (Khurramin) says:
  2. Vijaykumar Sheeri says:
  3. Milan Karakas says:

    +Sapoty Brook said:

    “salt water in the boiler? hmmm. it probably consumes a bit more energy to
    make it boil, and it would certainly require considerable redesign of the
    boiler to enable salt removal.”

    No, it is not salt water. Term salt is not referring to sodium chloride as
    many people think, but rather to many compounds containing chlorides,
    fluorides, nitrates, etc.

    In the case of thermal storage, here are some information on the wikipedia:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_storage

    “Molten salt can be employed as a thermal energy storage method to retain
    thermal energy collected by a solar tower or solar trough so that it can be
    used to generate electricity in bad weather or at night. It was
    demonstrated in the Solar Two project from 1995-1999. The system is
    predicted to have an annual efficiency of 99%, a reference to the energy
    retained by storing heat before turning it into electricity, versus
    converting heat directly into electricity.[7][8][9] The molten salt
    mixtures vary. The most extended mixture contains sodium nitrate, potassium
    nitrate and calcium nitrate. It is non-flammable and nontoxic, and has
    already been used in the chemical and metals industries as a heat-transport
    fluid, so experience with such systems exists in non-solar applications.
    The salt melts at 131 °C (268 °F). It is kept liquid at 288 °C (550 °F) in
    an insulated “cold” storage tank. The liquid salt is pumped through panels
    in a solar collector where the focused sun heats it to 566 °C (1,051 °F).
    It is then sent to a hot storage tank. This is so well insulated that the
    thermal energy can be usefully stored for up to a week.”

    So, yes – it ‘consumes’ a lot of free solar energy, but the goal is not
    bring molten salt (mixture) into boil, but rather into thermal transport
    and storage.

    And, then:

    “When electricity is needed, the hot salt is pumped to a conventional
    steam-generator to produce superheated steam for a turbine/generator as
    used in any conventional coal, oil or nuclear power plant. A 100-megawatt
    turbine would need a tank of about 9.1 metres (30 ft) tall and 24 metres
    (79 ft) in diameter to drive it for four hours by this design.”

    If you try to do the same job of thermal storage with water (which has
    pretty good thermal capacity), it has some problems with self cooling by
    evaporation, and for better efficiency require pressurized tanks (similar
    to pressure cooker).

    Cheers!

  4. khaled don says:

    ty for the video Sir

  5. Awethentic says:

    Published on 28 Jan 2013
    Beyond Zero Emissions intends to transform Australia from a 19th century
    fossil fuel based economy to a 21st century renewable powered clean tech
    economy with no carbon emissions. Sharon Shostak met up with some local
    residents/BZE volunteers who have taken the initiative to build a model to
    demonstrate a concentrating solar thermal plant, a technology beginning to
    proliferate in many countries but sadly remiss in Australia.
    Music excerpt by Norm Appel

  6. Jayme Capurso says:

    Those statistics are very embarrassing considering we get as much sun as
    anyone in the world and have vast amounts of unused desert. So has there
    been a decision of Pt Augusta yet?

  7. Glenn Hough says:

    SOLAR!!!

  8. Kalvin One says:

    Where can we buy that in Switzerland for our houses or balconies ? 

  9. marutheeswaran srinivasan says:
  10. Caleb Clark says:

    nice model and demo guys!

  11. Thomas Schuster says:

    Nice demo!
    Australia would be a perfect site for CSP-plants like this.
    If it would be just sunny and not a country with gigantic coal deposits too.
    You can supply a reliable power production with CSP, wind-power and
    biomass-fired thermal power plants.
    And you can do it easier and much cheaper with coal fired thermal power
    plants.
    As is mostly the case: Costs are the problem.
    CSP is still a very expensive way of power production, even compared with
    other renewables.
    And by the way: The CSP-plants in spain are rather small, most of them
    about 50 MW.

  12. Bean Cube says:

    Can coal be used like battery but to store thermal energy instead of
    burning them directly?

  13. Michael Gatz says:

    I liked the colorful flashing lights :)

  14. bimmjim says:

    Good work you Aussies. All your points are correct. The only problem is the
    government, just like here in North America. . . Mark Jacobson at Stanford
    University has a plan to convert all of NA to Wind, Solar, Hydro and
    Geothermal. He has determined the cost including new grids required and it
    all works. His plan would make more jobs and is good for the trade balance.
    It is beautiful economics. 

  15. ramalingam pillai says:

    good

  16. nexos6 says:

    Nice video

    Australia should be at the forefront of all these Renewable Technologies,
    with more political long term planning and a stronger emphasis on science
    they could have developed the know how and industry to be world leaders in
    these arts.

    I understand that all houses built in Israel for the past 40-50 years have
    to have a Solar Thermal Collector to heat water by Law – correct me if I
    am wrong.

    With the evacuated tube heaters that have been around now for about 30
    year’s that can heat water even through a layer of Snow I feel most
    countries that can should be implementing a similar policy. 

  17. LAUANTKAYPRODUCTION says:

    hi,like your work..do you have any idea of how it will cost to set this
    type to plant on half scale…

  18. Troy Baldoza says:

    This is awesome experimentation.. with this we could save energy even if
    its night time…

  19. Златко Попов says:

    Excellent model! Good job you guys. :)

  20. minecraft art pics says:

    Cool!

  21. P Oppsie says:

    Spain spent billions on this. DIdn’t work there, either. But cost a lot
    of money and used a lot of fossil fuels digging up the minerals to create
    the mirrors and fire the furnaces. Lose/lose

  22. tyrelli doomah says:

    Got one of these in Nevada. Result = kills off the birds. Birds are
    attracted by the glow on the tower and fly into the light beam. Continuous
    ‘streamers’ the vaporized bird parts falling after the beam. Probably not
    PETA approved?

  23. Molotok78Rus says:

    На батарейках? Это не серьезно!

Leave a Reply