Tankless Water Heater Port Orange

Posted on: June 29, 2015 by in Tankless Water Heater
25 Comments
Tankless Water Heater Port Orange


You can find our water heater tank rinsing wand on Amazon:
http://tinyurl.com/kd37urs

UPDATE – April 3, 2012: Regarding our use of an after-market anode rod. There are questions about which metal to use – magnesium, aluminum or zinc. As we mentioned in the video, we only chose this particular anode due to the extreme difficulty we had removing the original, despite the fact that it is a different material than the original rod. We’ve now inspected it after a year and are not happy that it did not decay as expected this year (did not decay at all), and are concerned it isn’t protecting the tank properly. After hearing from two friends who also have Suburban units, who removed their anodes without much trouble, we’re going back to the OEM rod with no drain, and will be updating the video when we do.

UPDATE — Sept 22, 2013: UPDATE! THE ANODE ROD VERDICT IS IN! SEE IT HERE:

We demonstrate how to thoroughly flush and clean an RV water heater.

Rust, lime scale and other debris can build up in the hot water tank on your motorhome, travel trailer or 5th wheel. Left alone, this can shorten the useful life of your water heater. Simple annual maintenance and care of your RV’s hot water system will save you money by extending the life of the heater.

We recently flushed the Suburban water heater on our Newmar, so rather than do it again, we’ve borrowed our friends’ Atwood water heater to demonstrate how to do it.

Only a few simple items are required, including a wrench to remove the drain plug or anode rod, a tank flush wand, and some white vinegar (1/2 gallon for every gallon of tank capacity). If you have a Suburban brand water heater, be sure to have a new replacement anode rod on hand as well (magnesium, aluminum or zinc/aluminum).

The small amount of time required to do this simple but essential maintenance will pay for itself with years of extra service from your RV’s hot water heater.

To hear about new videos, giveaways and other great RVing content as soon as it’s released, visit our website and subscribe!
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The intro music is my own piano performance of Scott Joplin’s Maple Leaf Rag from 1899.

Full-Time RVers since April 11, 2003, we share DIY (do it yourself) RV maintenance, repair, travel, upgrade and operational tips & tricks.

While we’re not RV technicians, we’re very mechanically inclined and have learned a lot about RV systems over the years. We’ve handled most of our own minor service, maintenance and upgrade work on both of our RVs.

We meet lots of newer RVers who are eager to learn some basics about using, maintaining and caring for their rigs. After more than a decade on the road, we’re happy to share what we’ve learned (some of it the hard way). 😉 We hope our experience can help other RVers go DIY, saving time & money while experiencing the satisfaction of a job well done.

We are not professional RV technicians and do not pretend to be experts on any particular topic. We mostly know about maintaining our own motorhome, so be sure to confirm that all methods and materials used are compatible with your equipment. Every RV is different, so your systems may not be the same as ours. Regardless of what we recommend, consult a professional if you’re unsure about working on your RV. We encourage you to do your own research. Any task you perform or product you purchase based on any information we provide is strictly at your own risk.

Comments welcome! Thanks for watching! Don’t forget to subscribe!

25 Responses

  1. RVgeeks says:

    @kb7iq I think the reason is Suburban uses a steel tank and Atwood uses an
    aluminum tank, making an anode unnecessary.

  2. Michael Snyder says:

    Are you filtering your city water on the way in?

  3. Eric Forst says:

    Could you use anti seize sof the bolt doesn’t rust

  4. RVgeeks says:

    Being full-timers, we’ve never stored our RV, so we’re not sure. Maybe
    someone else on here with more experience can comment. It likely depends on
    two things: what brand you have (Suburban or Atwood) and how long you’ll be
    storing it. The manufacturer’s websites might have details or you could
    look on one of the RV forums, like irv2.com. Sorry we weren’t more help on
    this one.

  5. RVgeeks says:

    The rinse-out wand alone is good for removing loose stuff, but won’t remove
    scale that’s still attached. We’ve heard of 2 other solutions: 1) Remove
    the over-pressure fitting (if possible) and add vinegar thru a funnel or 2)
    get a fitting that fits the drain plug hole and attach a 3′ length of hose
    to it. Hold the hose above the level of the tank and fill the hose with a
    funnel. Keep it elevated for a while (tie it up) to hold the vinegar in,
    but don’t heat the tank. Hope this helps!

  6. hoboprepper says:

    My coach has an Atwood heater with an anode plug. Just changed it today.
    Camco makes them for Atwood heaters with aluminum tanks. Got it at Camping
    World. Great video, Thanks.

  7. rob891 says:

    Just love your RV videos-steps & instructions are always clear & easy to
    understand. New to RVing (2nd season this year), I’ve learned a lot from
    your videos.

  8. happyending3000 says:

    Would it work if you use anti-seize on the steel threads of the Suburban
    anode?

  9. DD826 says:

    I thought the rod was suppose to ground, and that is why it is steel to
    steel?

  10. DD826 says:

    I am having a problem with my atwood(pilot). I can get the pilot to light,
    hold and then turn to ON,,, and the pilot goes out and the burner doesn’t
    ignite? Any ideas? thks

  11. Max1Chase1 says:

    Great video but cut the bottom of a round bleach or other container to
    divert the water from running on my gas port inlet and away from other
    accessories, also I always open a sink faucet to relieve pressure off the
    lines because air popping can cause a hose to pop off a fitting behind the
    wall.

  12. Destination Unknown says:

    Thank you 🙂 Just what we need folks like your self giving good advise. It
    helps to keep RVing even cheaper. 🙂 

  13. Eric Smith says:

    How about adding a threaded hose connector on the safety relief and adding
    some clear tubing down and out instead of dumping water and vinegar all
    over your other stuff in there.

  14. smacdiesel says:

    The best tutorial on this subject on youtube. Thanks!!

  15. Erika von Timme says:

    This just popped up as recommended. Just a note, A heater with an aluminum
    tank is busy sacrificing itself during operation. Where a steel tank needs
    the anode rod.

    I can see this need on a coach that is used continuously, carrying around a
    water heater tank full of water. Our toy hauler fifth wheel was mostly in
    storage and used only a month a year in several vacation stretches. We’d
    pull the drain and just allow it to drain before heading home. Do you have
    suggestions for this type of use?

  16. Jim Sanders says:

    Excellent video being a brand new RV’er I found this to be very
    informative. Thanks for providing it.

  17. Studa Baker says:

    Again, I want to thank you for these videos. I’m an RV n00b and bought a
    used motor home and ran into bad smelling water. Your bleach/water method I
    already used and I still got smelly water when running hot water. It went
    away after a while and I thought about cleaning the hot water heater and
    just ordered the flush wand. Never thought of the vinegar, great idea.
    Question though, my 2004 Southwind doesn’t have one of those pumping
    hoses(at least I can’t seem to find it). What is the alternative?

  18. charles lister says:

    Wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Do not do what he said and get a rod that will last
    longer verses the magnesium rod. The rod is there to sacrifice itself
    instead of the tank….if you get one that lasts 4 years…..guess what is
    being eaten away…yup your tank…..replace the rod every 1-2 years
    instead of getting a long life rod…..rods are cheap compared to a new
    tank….

  19. RVgeeks says:

    @charles lister: You’re absolutely right that an anode rod that sacrifices
    itself and does not last as long is the right way to go. You may have
    missed it, but we added 3 updates about it… one in the video description,
    an annotation, and a whole new video addressing the topic. Here’s the text
    from the video description:

    UPDATE – April 3, 2012: Regarding our use of an after-market anode rod.
    There are questions about which metal to use – magnesium, aluminum or zinc.
    As we mentioned in the video, we only chose this particular anode due to
    the extreme difficulty we had removing the original, despite the fact that
    it is a different material than the original rod. We’ve now inspected it
    after a year and are not happy that it did not decay as expected this year
    (did not decay at all), and are concerned it isn’t protecting the tank
    properly. After hearing from two friends who also have Suburban units, who
    removed their anodes without much trouble, we’re going back to the OEM rod
    with no drain, and will be updating the video when we do.

    UPDATE — Sept 22, 2013: UPDATE! THE ANODE ROD VERDICT IS IN! SEE IT HERE:
    http://youtu.be/tcxHIFKLVbc

  20. Nora Hoffert says:

    Getting ready to install a new Atwood water heater and I don’t think you
    should open the Pressure Relief valve! The manual states there should be an
    Air Gap and if through the season ; If you get a drip from the Valve to
    empty tank to restore the Air Gap…

  21. Bella Faith says:

    I need to no why I’m not getting no water resurrect in side my camper

  22. Charles Tait says:

    The anode must be electrically connected to what it protects! Do not use
    plumber’s tape!

  23. Pipinho Snow says:

    ?

  24. Brandon Clary says:

    What if you don’t have a diverter how do you put vinegar in the water
    heater

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